Articles & Reports

Beefy or B-Fe?

Iron is a mineral that is an essential component of myoglobin and haemoglobin, the molecules in the body that are responsible for carrying oxygen to where it is needed. Iron is also essential for development, growth, and synthesis of some hormones and connective tissues. Humans must obtain iron from their food, either in the heme form (from meat, seafood, and poultry) or non-heme form (found in plants, fortified foods, and the sources listed above). Women, vegetarians, those with Crohn’s or Coeliac disease and those who frequently donate blood are at greater risk of iron deficiency anemia. Symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include general fatigue, weakness, pale skin, shortness of breath, cold hands or feet, headache, dizziness, tingling in the extremities, swollen or sore tongue, and in some cases, cravings for non-food items such as dirt, ice, and clay. As there are different forms of anemia, talking to your doctor about getting a blood test is the best way to determine whether you have anemia and if so, what type.

Elise for Incontinence

Mapping every available washroom along one’s daily routine is a reality for many women of all ages who experience some form of urinary incontinence. It is estimated that nearly 10% of Canadian women are affected and although it is often assumed that incontinence is a normal part of aging and only the elderly are affected, this is not always the case. “Stress incontinence”, the involuntary leakage of urine when a person coughs, sneezes, strains or makes a sudden movement, can result when the muscles and tissues around the opening of the bladder get weak.

Pumping Up Your Iron

Feeling overly tired or weak? Have pale skin and feeling cold? Experiencing chest pain or a rapid heartrate? Feeling an uncomfortable tingling or a creepy-crawly sensation in your legs? Getting the urge to nibble on some ice or dirt? Fighting infections frequently? These are some of the possible signs and symptoms of iron deficiency and if you experience all of these, you should speak with your doctor. Iron is a very important mineral in our bodies as it is an essential component of hemoglobin, which carries oxygen to the tissues.

Nobody Walks With Another Man’s Gait

A Kenyan proverb says that “Nobody walks with another man’s gait.” GAIT is the way in which someone walks. Each of us is born with a unique biomechanical combination of muscles, tendons, ligaments, and skeletal structure which is designed to carry us through a lifetime of walking. This gives us our unique, natural way of walking. But sometimes, we are forced to change the way we walk, whether it be due to an injury, accident, weight-gain, surgery, habit, aging or simply over-use.

Achy Breaky Body

Pain. What a terrible 4-letter word. However, living pain-free may be more within reach than you think. Without trivializing it too much, pain is a perceived sensation with many potential causes. It is a subjective feeling triggered in the nervous system by a physical stimulus such as a blunt or shearing force, a chemical, a poke, a pinch, etc. So, we can feel “pain” when we get a trivial paper cut or, more seriously, suffer a car accident, shingles outbreak, pinched nerve, severed limb, etc. In a way, it is an evil game of “telephone” between the trigger site and your brain. Imagine if we can somehow interrupt this telephone game; the message would be lost and you will not have that sensation of pain anymore. Sound too good to be true? Read on!

Mushrooms for Life

Growing up in an Asian household, we always thought that mushrooms were simply tasty foods, especially shiitake mushrooms which can add a savoury touch to so many dishes. Maitake mushrooms are particularly tasty when simmered in a hot-pot broth. But, I’m not here to give you a cooking lesson…at least not this month! For us, we realized the importance of mushrooms for their medicinal purposes when our uncle was diagnosed with 4th stage cancer and our father, Dr. Henry Cheng, put him on the Yunzhi mushroom (aka. Coriolus or Turkey Tail) as a part of the integrative approach he took to conquer his cancer.

4 R’s For Gastro-intestinal Health

Optimal gastro-intestinal (G-I) health is a key component of overall wellness. The common saying, “You are what you eat” is very true. For centuries, the ancient Chinese believed that “All wellness and ailments originate from the central gut”. Dysfunction of the GI tract has been linked to various disease states including immune disorders, respiratory problems, mental acuity, energy level, mood, weight control, skin, joint, blood, and of course stomach and intestinal problems.

Bugs In Your Belly

The landscape of our gut gives epic meaning to the term, “internal conflict”. At any one time, the healthy human gut carries approximately 100 trillion micro-organisms in the intestines. This number is 10X greater than the total number of human cells in the body! The majority of these micro-orgnisms are bacteria, and because they are perpetually active, some scientists even view them collectively as an “organ” in the body, processing and releasing important nutrients and byproducts into the gut.

Medical Foods and Metabolic Syndrome

High blood pressure, increased blood glucose levels, excess body fat around the waist, elevated triglyceride levels, and reduced HDL (or “good”) cholesterol levels…each of these risk factors are undesirable conditions on their own, but if you have a combination of any three of these, you may have Metabolic Syndrome. Although having Metabolic Syndrome increases your risk of having heart disease, diabetes, and stroke, it is not an inevitable conclusion. A physician-approved exercise plan along with some conscious changes in the diet to include more fibre, vegetables and fruit will go a long way to improve each of these risk factors. For some people, inclusion of a Medical Food such as Ultrameal® can help meet their health goals.

    Cart